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Everybody lies..

Let me prove it to you.

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Undeniably, everyone owns deep secrets, relentlessly kept away from the pestering eyes of others, including, yes that’s right, friend zones. We mean stuff you will never tell unless tortured.

Or, you could be a creature, a representative of a a special breed of alien race, who are genetically engineered to never lie. Only genetics can try to rip of the genome responsible for lying. Because a creature that could never lie will look weird in its artificial nature. Assuming you were not made in a laboratory, despise what your mother told you, we daresay you must have your share of secrets. Keeping secrets makes your mind vulnerable to getting used to lying, like it’s something tuned to the same laws, also responsible for holding our universe together.

To better understand the fact that everyone has something to hide, I present to you this example: when casually asked if you ever tried to suck your own dick, you’d instinctively deny. Even if you really did. Right?

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Yeah, I also sucked other peoples dick before too… right?

But it would be a lie, especially if you happen to own a dick. All dick owners can confirm (but only to themselves) the terrible truth about this and other terrible facts. And we all would hurry up and deny it regardless if true or false. It’s what we do. By the way notice that dick owners also include people who had undergone a sex change – they would never be able to lie about why they did it. To suck their own dick. Obviously.

Hard-coded lies, like this one, are the reason your brain is automated to bring forth ego protective functions, and introduce them to your attention over and over, even when dealing with less threatening situations. Like when asked by a beggar if you have change.

“NO!” – you’d say, knowing you definitely have some in your pocket. So you lied to save you trouble of having to deal with a homeless dude. If you could just wire him the coins, you’d do just that. Following this model of behavior, little exercises in the art of lying quickly stretches in a lifestyle. You are hitching on a road with a dead end where you get to realize that the driver who took a side the main road and raped you was actually you. Ah, the pain, the pain, the moment you realize that lying and being fake defines of who you really are.

Most successful marriages are based on lies. Especially when there are much more people keeping a close eye on you. Much more than when you decided not to get rid of the annoying coins you got there stuck in your back pocket.

Brandelina!

Brandelina!

All the secrets we prefer to deny access to forever are turning us into sickos running multiple personalities. Wait, there is a good side too – you no longer experience personal discomfort about lying. You do it better than second nature. It even feels good when you tell a lie and hurts when truth have to be revealed.

Compulsive lies tend to sprig out of your mouth up suddenly, without waring or further ado, unprovoked or enforced. The question that remains is – is this what we really are – double faced weirdos, programmed to be unreal in a world where physical fitness is no longer required to survive. You’d lie even if your life depends on telling the truth. Let’s ask doctor House.

"Humanity is overrated."

“Humanity is overrated.”

You see, lying in this time and age is fine, absolutely necessary if you ask lawyers or traders. But imagine the power of this fake behavior 3000 years ago. You live in a cave and a bear comes along. You want to imagine the bear away or lie to her about the tastefulness of your meat. Or imagine someone ate the last piece of smoked coyote, but forgot to wipe his mouth afterwards…

My point is – in the past there were serious problems with surviving where lying was really what is should be today – unnecessary and meaningless function of the brain, that only recently developed to unbelievable levels. We now have governments now whom we entrusted with making our lives easier and better. But who instead specialize in lying about it. Like a pro.

 

 

One Comment

  1. Pingback: The I against ‘I’ issue

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